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Siamese twins before separation
In this Sept. 6, 2016 photo provided by the Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, conjoined twins from Nigeria, Miracle and Testimony Ayeni, sit at Le Bonheur Children's Hospital before being separated in Memphis, Tenn. The girls were conjoined at the lower half of the body and separated following about an 18-hour procedure. (Lisa W. Buser/Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital via AP)

Nigerian siamese twins, Miracle and Testimony Ayeni, have been successfully separated at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

The twins joined at the lower half of the body were born in Enugu State on the 16th November, 2015.

Their father, Samuel Ayeni and mother, Mary, are both natives of Kogi State.

A statement by the Founder of the Linking Hands Foundation, LHF, Mrs Efe Farinre, said that the highly complex and extremely risky procedure lasted for 18 hours early this month.

According to the surgical team lead by Dr. Max Langham, conjoined twins occur once in 200,000 live births, with six percent of those being ischiopagus (joining by lower half of the body).

Speaking after the successful separation of the twins, Mr. Samuel Ayeni said; “Without faith, things wouldn’t have worked out. When you give everything to God and believe, He will give you peace. I have the faith that He is helping us.”

Siamese twins after separation
In this Nov. 8, 2016 photo provided by the Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital, twins from Nigeria, Miracle and Testimony Ayeni, rest after being separated at Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital in Memphis, Tenn. The girls were conjoined at the lower half of the body and separated following about an 18-hour procedure. (Lisa W. Buser/Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital via AP)

Farinre recalled that LHF was introduced to the Ayenis by an extended friend and that after a telephone discussion with Mr. Ayeni, LHF made a commitment to help solicit financial and non-financial support towards the medical needs of the twins, as part of its “Every-Child-Counts Initiative.”

He added that though LHF had received an estimated quotation of $1,000,000 from one of the hospitals the organisation had reached out to on behalf of the Ayeni twins, Le Bonheur Children’s took up the treatment and surgical separation of the twins at no charge.

The hospital has also provided free accommodation for the Ayenis at its FedEx Family House for the duration of the twins’ treatment.

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